If you didn't remove the old canes right after they fruited last summer, take those out first. Primocane Vs. Floricane – Distinguishing Between Primocanes And Floricanes, Raspberry Plant Problems: Reasons For Raspberry Canes Turning Brown, Pruning Black Raspberry Bushes: How To Prune Black Raspberries, Prickly Kale Leaves – Does Kale Have Thorns, Corn Husk Wreath Ideas: How To Make A Corn Husk Wreath, DIY Air Plant Wreaths: Wreath Making With Air Plants, Crabgrass Varieties: Information On Types Of Crabgrass Weeds, Gardens And Lightning: Learn About Lightning Safety Out In Gardens, Roselle Flower Seeds: What Are Uses For Roselle Seeds, Pruning In The Garden – Do You Have To Prune Garden Plants, Thanksgiving Tradition: Turning Homegrown Pumpkins Into Pie, Growing Thanksgiving Dinner – Must Have Turkey Side Dishes, Interesting Uses For Pecans: What To Do With Pecans, The Bountiful Garden: Bringing The Garden To Thanksgiving. Prune summer fruiting raspberries in the late summer or fall, after the berries have been harvested. This is accomplished, also in the spring, by simply cutting all of your patches first-year growth down to the ground. The remaining new canes need to be thinned out in the spring, leaving 3 to 4 of the largest remaining canes per foot of row. (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); © 1972 - 2020 National Gardening Association, Times are presented in US Central Standard Time, Today's site banner is by DeerXing and is called "Always Living Hens and Chicks". Red Raspberry Bush Pruning. Many gardeners sacrifice the summer raspberry crop and only harvest the fall crop, which is superior in quality. If you want to harvest raspberries from both the fall and early summer crop, fall-bearing raspberry pruning is somewhat more complicated. Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips! The floracanes fruit from the lower buds in the summer, and at the same time, new first year primocanes will be growing in. Later in spring, remove the first flush of new replacement canes when they get six inches tall. Most varieties should be five or six feet tall after you've finished pruning. Use these convenient icons to share this page on various social media platforms: Articles → Plants → Edibles → Small Fruits and Berries → Raspberry, Articles → General → Garden Care → Plant Care Techniques. These are called fall-bearing or ever-bearing raspberries, and, to keep that fruit coming, you must prune the canes. Find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Keep up to date with all that's happening in and around the garden. Late winter or early spring, just at the end of the dormant season, is the best time to prune summer-bearing red raspberries. So the only portion you should remove is the very tip, where the cane becomes thinner or somewhat undersized. grow in the wild and in gardens throughout U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 3 through 10. Following summer harvest, prune off the old fruiting canes to the ground. Late winter or early spring, just at the end of the dormant season, is the best time to prune summer-bearing red raspberries. Pruning Summer Raspberries. Leave 10-12 of the healthiest canes, about ¼ inches in diameter, with 6-inch spacing. Buds that formed there late last season are not strong and often suffer winter damage. These are called fall-bearing or ever-bearing raspberries, and, to keep that fruit coming, you must prune the canes. Leave the healthiest and strongest canes. How to Prune Summer-Fruiting Raspberry Canes. If you didn't remove the old canes right after they fruited last summer, take those out first. Once you have picked all the crop from summer-fruiting raspberries, loganberries and tayberries, you should prune out the old stems. With summer bearing raspberries, in the next year, these primocanes will become floricanes, which are the darker fruiting canes with a thin brown bark, and new thinner green primocanes will emerge from the base of the raspberry plant. The next step is shortening the remaining canes. Tip prune any that may have suffered cold damage. You’ll find this guide particularly helpful when your raspberry canes have grown slightly out of control. Next, you can shorten the canes that are left, but easy does it! Terms of Service apply. Step 1. Pruning Fall-Bearing Raspberries As for tip-pruning fall-bearing raspberries, I think each gardener must come to an understanding with the variety under their care. In late winter, cut back all of the canes to 5 feet above ground. Remember that the top of the shoot has the most fruit buds, so only trim off the very tip. Then thin the canes that will bear this season's crop. According to Marvin Pritts, a small fruits specialist at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, the most fruitful portion is the top third of the cane. You will leave this season’s canes (primocanes) in place. Prune out all the smaller ones, leaving fruiting canes four to six inches apart in a bed that's about a foot wide. Prune out all the smaller ones, leaving fruiting canes four to six inches apart in a bed that's about a foot wide. You’ll want to thin out the new primocanes at the same time, only leaving the tallest, most vigorous canes.   These raspberries bear fruit on 2-year-old canes, the ones that sprouted the previous season. The top portion of the cane is most fruitful because the buds are spaced more closely there. When you are pruning summer fruiting raspberries’ first year canes, remove the smallest and weakest ones first. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Fall-bearing – These can be pruned for either one crop or two. Here's how. Summer-bearing – Remove all weak canes to the ground in early spring. Summer Bearing Red (and yellow) Raspberry Bush Pruning. Summer-bearing raspberries can be further categorized as early season, mid-season, and late season in terms of when they bear fruit. If you decide to sacrifice the early summer crop, you simply prune all of the canes to the ground at the end of winter. Harvesting raspberries. For support, fasten the canes to a trellis, which can be as simple as a single strand of wire set slightly lower than the tops of your canes. The buds at the tips of the primocanes fruit in autumn, while the lower cane buds do not fruit until early the following summer.