Container Trees | Trees in Pots. Here are some ideas: A restricted apple tree grown on a semi-dwarfing rootstock ; Japanese maple; Topiary specimen of box, yew, bay, privet or holly ; Dwarf conifer; Something unusual like Sophora microphylla or Albizia julibrissin Save 30 per cent on Sunday tickets* for BBC Gardeners' World Live 2021. You could also look for a multi-stemmed tree. Slow-growing with long-lasting, pink bracts in spring and purple autumn leaves. Receive perfectly portioned snacks delivered straight to your door, Subscribe to BBC Gardeners' World Magazine and receive 12 issues for only £39.99 - saving 39%. This is why trees suitable for growing in pots are often called "patio trees". A chaste tree is a Mediterranean and Asian native with multiple trunks that can be trained to make a nice shade tree. The Persian silk tree has finely divided, mimosa-like leaves and flowers that resemble pink shaving-brushes, which give this hardy, shrubby tree an exotic look. Make sure the pot contains drainage holes in the base and if not, add your own. It can also be pruned into a shrub. Look for an apple growing on M26 (dwarfing) rootstock. Small-leaved privets, including California privet ( L. ovalifolium ) and European privet ( L. vulgare ), are the species most commonly grown in gardens, and both thrive in containers in full sun to partial shade. Snowy mespilus is often grown multi-stemmed. Just make sure Japanese Maples aren't in strong sunlight that can scorch the delicate foliage. Since the size of a tree is usually proportional to the size of its root system, containers, in most cases, will restrict its ultimate size. When choosing your tree, search for varieties described as ‘dwarfing’ – a ‘vigorous’ tree will grow too quickly to be happy in a pot, while an ‘extremely dwarfing’ tree will be too weak to cope with growing in a pot. Although Italian cypress grows very tall, it can be clipped to keep it in check. Rare and highly sought after, Hyacinth 'Midnight Mystic'® is the first and original black hyacinth. After four or five years, you’ll most likely need to repot your tree, either into a slightly larger pot or you can root prune the tree and replant it into the same pot with fresh compost. The ideal types of tree to grow in pots are slow-growing or dwarf varieties. IF YOU KNOW THE NAME OF THE VARIETY OF TREE, PLEASE USE THE SEARCH BOX ABOVE. This is why trees suitable for growing in pots are often called "patio trees". Create a formal look with a matching pair. When planting a tree into a pot or container, we recommend using one that is about twice the size of the root ball. *Valid on standard one-day tickets only, transaction fee applies. Varieties \"Silver Spire\" and \"Alba\" have white blossoms, while \"Latifolia\" and \"Rosea\" have pink flowers. You could also look for a multi-stemmed tree. Positioned on patios, decking, driveways, outside your front door or back door they make a very smart addition to your outside space. Keep them in a sheltered position, out of strong winds and hot midday sun. It is perfectly possible to grow trees in pots if you select a suitable variety, such as those listed here. Potted trees depend on you for feeding and watering. Common deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs are listed here: With the arrival of the winter season many of us are spending more time indoors, so why not brighten up your home and purify the air with a range of wonderful and architecturally interesting indoor plants. Ornamental Trees Ltd. VAT no. Olive trees are ideal for sheltered urban plots and should be moved into a greenhouse or porch when the weather gets very cold. This site uses cookies to provide and improve your shopping experience. Just make … Patios are ideal places for growing small trees in containers because they are so often sheltered and sunny spots where many trees do particularly well. Shop 100+ cherry trees with many brand new varieties for 2020. When choosing your tree, search for varieties described as ‘dwarfing’ – a ‘vigorous’ tree will grow too quickly to be happy in a pot, while an ‘extremely dwarfing’ tree will be too weak to cope with growing in a pot. Fruit trees are often sold attached to a rootstock that controls how big they eventually grow. This delicate, small tree boasts spring blossom and vibrant autumn colour. Japanese maples are slow-growing and come in a huge variety of colours. Most magnolias grow too large for pot, but the star magnolia is a compact, multi-stemmed type, with star-like flowers. The conical shape of this cornus adds architectural interest. We work with the country's best nurseries to bring you only the best quality trees, quickly, well packaged and at a great price. Keep them well watered all year round and particularly in summer when their soil can dry out very quickly. From the team at Gardeners' World Magazine.