Nemesis was widely used in the Greek tragedies and various other literary works, being the deity that would give what was due to the protagonist. She is implacable justice: that of Zeus in the Olympian scheme of things, although it is clear she existed prior to him, as her images look similar to several other goddesses, such as Cybele, Rhea, Demeter, and Artemis.[6]. O. Gruppe (1906) and others connect the name with "to feel just resentment". § 3, vii. Its object was to avert the nemesis of the dead, who were supposed to have the power of punishing the living, if their cult had been in any way neglected (Sophocles, Electra, 792; E. Rohde, Psyche, 1907, i. The father of Helene the Greeks like everybody else hold to be not Tyndareos (Tyndareus) but Zeus. Nemesis, her devotees and her place in the Roman world are fully discussed, with examples, in Hornum, Michael B., "Nemesis – Origin and history of nemesis by Online Etymology Dictionary", "Metamorphoses (Kline) 3, the Ovid Collection, Univ. [2], Goddess of retribution in Greek mythology. or of Oceanus (Tzetz. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd AD) : Pseudo-Hyginus, Astronomica 2. From it sprang Helen, who excelled all other girls in beauty. 33. Pausanias noted her iconic statue there. She was worshipped by a society called Hadrian's freedmen. Theog. Nemesis is frequently called Adrastia, and also Rhamnusia, from Rhamnus in Attica, the chief seat of her worship, which contained a celebrated statue of the goddess. Nemesis the goddess (perhaps of fertility) was worshipped at Rhamnus in Attica and was very similar to Artemis (a goddess of wild animals, vegetation, childbirth, and the hunt). arrogance before the gods. After he rejected the advances of the nymph Echo, Nemesis lured him to a pool where he caught sight of his own reflection and fell in love with it, eventually dying.[9]. [10] She is shown on a few examples of Imperial coinage as Nemesis-Pax, mainly under Claudius and Hadrian. Fab. [citation needed]. From this union, she laid an egg, which some herdsman found among the trees and handed over to Lede (Leda). In early times the representations of Nemesis resembled Aphrodite, who sometimes bears the epithet Nemesis. 5. The four famous Telkhines (Telchines), Aktaios (Actaeus), Megalesios (Megalesius), Ormenos (Ormenus) and Lykos (Lycus), whom Bakkhylides (Bacchylides) calls the children of Nemesis and Tartaros. [citation needed] Later, Nemesis came to suggest the resentment caused by any disturbance of this right proportion, the sense of justice that could not allow it to pass unpunished. Because he was seen by men flying high in the sky, they said he was put in the stars. [citation needed]. As such, she meted out punishment for evil deeds, undeserved good fortune, and hubris (arrogance before the gods). Rich-haired Nemesis gave birth to her [Helene (Helen)] when she had been joined in love with Zeus the king of the gods by harsh violence. arrogance before the gods. According to another myth, Nemesis created an egg, from which two sets of twins hatched; one set was Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra, and the other was the Dioscuri. It is in this way that Leda comes to be the mother of Helen of Troy, as she kept the egg in a chest until it hatched.[8]. While she slept, Jupiter [Zeus] embraced her and then flew away. Nemesis did not thrust him away, but holding him in her arms, fell into a deep sleep. 236, note I). It was believed that she was the daughter of the primordial god Oceanus. The word nemesis originally meant the distributor of fortune, neither good nor bad, simply in due proportion to each according to what was deserved. She was often called "Goddess of Rhamnous", an isolated place in Attica, where a temple was attributed to her. i. She was often called "Goddess of Rhamnous", … Having heard this legend [the sculptor] Pheidias has represented Helene as being led to Nemesis by Leda, and he has represented Tyndareos and his children. 88; Paus. et D. 183). Stasinus of Cyprus or Hegesias of Aegina, Cypria Fragment 8 (trans. She was considered a remorseless goddess. Mercurius (Mercury) Hermes took it away and carried it to Sparta and threw it in Leda's lap. For Nemesis tried to escape him and liked not to lie in love with her father Zeus the son of Kronos (Cronus); for shame and indignation vexed her heart: therefore she fled him over the land and fruitless dark sea. Nemesis was the goddess of divine retribution and revenge, who would show her wrath to any human being that would commit hubris, i.e. See Also: Narcissus, Oceanus, Erebus, Nyx. In the Theogony, Nemesis is the sister of the Moirai (the Fates), the Keres (Black Fates), the Oneiroi (Dreams), Eris (Discord) and Apate (Deception), In some metaphysical mythology, Nemesis produced the egg from which hatched two sets of twins: Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra, and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux. But Nemesis, as if wedded to the tribe of birds, when her months were ended, bore an egg. 4 (trans. of Virginia E-Text Center", Important Facts on Nemesis in Greek Mythology, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nemesis&oldid=990841012, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles having different image on Wikidata and Wikipedia, Articles containing Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text, Articles with unsourced statements from September 2017, Articles with unsourced statements from May 2015, Wikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica with Wikisource reference, Wikipedia articles incorporating text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. It included a crown of stags and little Nikes and was made by Pheidias after the Battle of Marathon (490 BC), crafted from a block of Parian marble brought by the overconfident Persians, who had intended to make a memorial stele after their expected victory. In the third century AD, there is evidence of the belief in an all-powerful Nemesis-Fortuna. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C7th or C6th BC) : Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 3. She was also called Adrasteia, meaning “the inescapable,” or the “Goddess of Rhamnous” in recognition of her famous temple in the city Rhamnous. To make this really true, Jupiter put the swan flying and the eagle pursuing in the sky. Divine retribution is a major theme in the Hellenic world view, providing the unifying theme of the tragedies of Sophocles and many other literary works. A festival called Nemeseia (by some identified with the Genesia) was held at Athens. Unable to abandon his reflection, he died there. [5] Hesiod states: "Also deadly Nyx bore Nemesis an affliction to mortals subject to death" (Theogony, 223, though perhaps an interpolated line). 8 (trans. One myth concerning Nemesis is that of Narcissus. The Greeks say that Nemesis was the mother of Helene (Helen), while Leda suckled and nursed her. Nemesis is a personification of the moral reverence for law, of the natural fear of committing a culpable action, and hence of conscience, and for this reason she is mentioned along with Aidôs, i. e. Shame (Hes. When Jupiter [Zeus], moved by desire, had begun to love Nemesis, and couldn't persuade her to lie with him, he relieved his passion by the following plan. There she was a daughter of Oceanus, the primeval river-ocean that encircles the world. Constellation Swan (Cygnus). Nemesis, in Greek religion, two divine conceptions, the first an Attic goddess, the daughter of Nyx (Night), and the second an abstraction of indignant disapproval, later personified. Grant) (Roman mythographer C2nd AD) : Bacchylides, Fragment 52 (from Tzetzes on Theogony) (trans. Nemesis was the goddess of divine retribution and revenge, who would show her wrath to any human being that would commit hubris, i.e.